Inside the Current Issue:

 

Cycling the Commonwealth

Photographs by Jack Looney

With boundless beautiful scenery, Virginia is a place that encourages being outdoors, and one of the best ways to take in the foliage and fresh air is to bike one of Virginia’s trails. Whether paved or dirt, short or long, difficult or beginner level, Virginia has bike trails that everyone can enjoy. Many of Virginia’s old railroad grades have been converted into multi-use recreation trails perfect for outdoor lovers who prefer more moderate and leisurely outdoor experiences. On many of the trails, hiking and horseback riding are also permitted. Biking can be a wonderful way to spend a day as the weather turns from the dog days of summer to the beautiful crisp autumn air.

The Luthier of Lexington

By Emily Smith
Photographs by Scott Smith

Self-taught luthier Paulo Kensaku Yuba lives in Lexington, VA, where he spends much of his time in his garage workshop. Lining the walls of his lamp-lit workspace are rows of chisels, wood planers, and measuring tools. Recycled jam jars cover shelves, filled with homemade varnishes of varying shades. Freshly fallen wood carvings have collected on the counter tops, like recently cut golden curls. Kensaku is a maker of stringed instruments.

Kensaku was born in Brazil, where he was raised within a Japanese farming community. With Japanese as his first language and Portuguese as his second, his wife, Janet Ikeda, and son, Tanyu, often translate from Japanese to English for him. Kensaku met Janet while they were both in Japan; she was working on her dissertation and he was studying at a Buddhist monastery. Together they have a son, Tanyu, who was born on the same farm as Kensaku. Janet and Tanyu moved to Charlottesville, VA in 1991, where Ken joined them two years later. During his time in Charlottesville, Kensaku made instruments in the windowless basement of his home, and also worked for eight years repairing instruments at Music & Arts. In 1999, the family moved to Lexington where they now reside.elf-taught luthier Paulo Kensaku Yuba lives in Lexington, VA, where he spends much of his time in his garage workshop. Lining the walls of his lamp-lit workspace are rows of chisels, wood planers, and measuring tools. Recycled jam jars cover shelves, filled with homemade varnishes of varying shades. Freshly fallen wood carvings have collected on the counter tops, like recently cut golden curls. Kensaku is a maker of stringed instruments.

 

China in Virginia

The Reeves Collection of Ceramics at Washington and Lee University

By Ronald Fuchs II, Curator

In the fall of 1963, a postcard from Euchlin Reeves, Washington and Lee School of Law, Class of 1927, found its way to Jim Whitehead, Washington and Lee’s treasurer. It read, simply, “Someday I may wish to make a donation of a work of art to the university. Are you interested?” The “work of art” in question was in fact an enormous collection of over 2,000 pieces of Chinese, English, and Continental European ceramics assembled by Reeves and his wife Louise Herreshoff. Never one to turn down a gift and sensing its potential as a teaching tool, Whitehead built a friendship with the Reeves’ that culminated in the gift of the collection in 1967.

In the fifty years since it arrived on campus in over 200 barrels, the collection has expanded and grown. It is displayed in the Reeves Center, a temple-fronted former faculty residence that was built in 1842 and renovated last year. New display cases, lighting, and interpretive text highlight more than 800 pieces that tell the stories of ceramics made in Asia, Europe, and the Americas between 1500 and 1900.

A Warm Welcome

The Door as a Reflection of the Homeowner

By Cathy Purple Cherry AWA, Founding Principal an Alan Cook, Project Manager of Purple Cherry Architects

What do a “welcome” mat, a Christmas wreath, a yellow ribbon, and a newly married couple all have in common? If you guessed the “front door,” you were right! The front door has evolved from the hole of a cave to the flap of a teepee, from the leather-strapped logs of a remote cabin to the incredible metal cast doors of the Vatican.

Adial Pharmaceuticals

A Fresh Start for Alcohol Use Disorder

Charlottesville-based Adial Pharmaceuticals is developing a genetically targeted drug to treat alcoholism in patients with a particular genetic profile. The company went public in July, the first initial public offering of intellectual property developed at the University of Virginia. The potential treatment was identified by Dr. Bankole Johnson, former chairman of the UVA Psychiatry Department. Johnson, who left UVA in 2013, now leads the psychiatry department at the University of Maryland and is chairman of Adial’s board of directors.

Slices of Life

Dear Lord, Leave Me in Virginia

By Mary Moroney

Mackey, with some reluctance, accompanied her mother Stuart to visit her college roommate in Uganda. About as limp as a wet rag, Mackey held out her hand to her mother’s friend.

“Mom has spoken so much about you. I am so happy to be here and out of that van,” Mackey laughed as she indicated toward the vehicle. “My brain feels like scrambled eggs.”

Jolly Time

Everyone loves popcorn. It has become a mainstay at movie theaters, sporting events, amusement parks, in our homes, and nearly everywhere else people gather.

It is a popular Thanksgiving myth that the Native Americans taught the Pilgrims the magic of popcorn at the first Thanksgiving. When the English settlers arrived in Virginia in 1607, corn was a key food crop of the Native Americans, and quickly became a major food source for the English colonists, as well. Relatively easy to grow and abundantly productive, corn played a central role in supporting the colony as a food source for both people and their animals. But the type of corn grown in Virginia had too thin a hull to contain the pressure necessary to cause a “puffy” explosion.